Beautiful pictures of Baluchistan

WATER POUNDS

MAKRAN COASTAL ROAD

BALOCHISTAN SPHINX

WATER FALL

QUETTA

MAKARAN COASTAL HIGH WAY ROAD

BOLAN PASS

QUETTA CITY

MANA VALLEY

BALOCHISTAN

Gwadar: Balochistan broadway

Balochistan

Balochistan

Balochistan -Turbat

Balochistan

Gwadar:balochistan Broadway

Balochistan

Balochistan

Wooded MosQuE,Balochistan

National FLAG Of bALOCHISTAN

Spring in Balochistan

GWADAR BEACH

Mariabad,Quetta

Quetta

Road 2 no where

July flood in balochistan 1

July flood in balochistan 2

MariaBad,Quetta

BOLAN CITY

ROAD OF BOLAN

Waterfall in Balochistan

Our Schools

Quetta

Balochistan Sphinx

kolPar Bolan Pass

Balochi Village

Desert LandScape

Gans Beach

Miri Fort Turbat

Makurani Fisher Mans

Moon Scape

Sunset @ Ganz

WatarFall

Gwadar

Pir-Gaib Falls

Desert near Quetta

beautiful  Gwadar

KIRTA  BOLAN


Quetta City at Night

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Quetta City, Balochistan, at night

Another View of Quetta at Night

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Another view of Quetta, Balochistan, at night

An Aerial View of Quetta

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of an arial view of Quetta, Balochistan

An Aerial View of Quetta Valley with Barren Mountains in the Background

Pictures of Quetta: Photo of an aerial view of Quetta Valley with barren mountains in the background - Photos of Quetta, Images of Quetta

Hanna Lake, near Quetta

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Hanna Lake, near Quetta, Balochistan (1)

Hanna Lake, near Quetta

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Hanna Lake, Quetta, Balochistan (2)

Quetta City’s Video

Quetta Railway Station

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Quetta Railway Station, Balochistan

A View of Quetta Cantonment.The mountain with snow at the background gives a beautiful look to the clean area of Quetta cantonment.

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; A View of Quetta Cantonment, Balochistan

Command & Staff College, Quetta

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Command & Staff College, Quetta, Balochistan

Old Building of Command & Staff College

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Old Building of Staff College, Quetta, Balochistan

A Labourer on a Street in Quetta. Look at his radiant face and spirit with which he is participating in Independence Day celebrations by hoisting Pakistani flag on his push cart.

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of A labourer on a street in Quetta, Balochistan

Race Course Quetta 1935. The Race Course in Quetta, shortly after the earthquake of May 31st, 1935. Officers from the Staff College organized a refugee camp at the Race Course.

Photos of Quetta, Balochistan: Photo of Race Course at Quetta,, shorty after the earthquake of May 31, 1935

Rare Photo of Quetta – Bruce Road, now Jinnah Road, 1900s or 1910s. Jinnah Road (Called Bruce Road during the colonial period) was the most beautiful road of Quetta . All these beautiful buildings were destroyed in the earthquake of 1935. This photo shows the Regal Chowk in the foreground. Photo by quettabalochistan2.

Extremely rare Pictures of Quetta: Bruce Road, now Jinnah Road, Photo of 1900s or 1910s - Old and rare Photos, Images of Quetta

A Train near Quetta

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of A Train near Quetta, Balochistan

Train and Road, Bolan Pass, Balochistan. A train passing through a tunnel in the mountains of Balochistan in Bolan Pass. National Highway is also running along the railway track.

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of a train and road, Balochistan

Train and Heavy Road Traffic in Bolan Pass. A train is going into a tunnel and heavy traffic is plying on the road in Bolan Pass.

Pictures of Balochistan: A Train going into a tunnel and heavy traffic on the road in Bolan Pass - Photos, Images of Balochistan

A Bridge and Railway Tunnel in Bolan, Balochistan

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Pic of A Railway Bridge and Railway Tunnel in Bolan, Balochistan

Another Railway Tunnel in Balochistan

 Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of A Railway tunnel in Balochistan

Snow Covered Hills and Lake in Balochistan

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of  Snow covered hills and lake in Balochistan

Wali Tangi. Located 25 km from Quetta.

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan;Wali Tangi, 25 km away from Quetta, Balochistan

Train in the Valley–Balochistan

 Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Train in the valley, Balochistan

A Train in Balochistan

 Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of A train in Balochistan

Railway Track–Balochistan

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Railway track, Balochistan

Pakistani Flag on a Hill, Dera Bugti, Balochistan

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Pakistani Flag on a Hill near Dera Bugti, Balochistan

Gawadar, Balochistan. A beautiful view of Gawadar.

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Gawadar, Balochistan

The Picturesque Gwadar Coastline. Photo by MyPak

Pictures of Gawadar, Balochistan: A picturesque view of  Gwadar Coastline - Photos, Images of Gawadar, Balochistan

Aerial View of Gawadar

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan;Photo of Gawadar, Balochistan: Aerial view of Gawadar

Hingol National Park, Makran, Balochistan. Hingol National Park ( ہنگول ),  190 km, located about190 km from Karachi, covers about 1,650 km² and is one of the largest National Parks Pakistan. It  lies on the Makran coast in Balochistan and is known to support at least 35 species of mammals, 65 species of amphibians and reptiles, 185 species of birds and more than 250 plant species. The park is also an excellent habitat to wild Sindh Ibex, Afghan Urial and Chinkara Gazelle.

Pictures of Balochistan: Photo of Hingol National Park, Makran, Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan, Images of Balochistan

Hingol River, Makran, BalochistanHingol River is located in Makran, Balochistan. The river is 350 miles long and is the longest in Balochistan. It winds through the Hingol valley between high cliffs. The river flows all year long, unlike most other streams in Balochistan which only flow during rare rains. The river and valley are located in Hingol National Park.

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Hingol River, Balochistan

A Bridge Over Hingol River, Makran, Balochistan

 Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan;  Photo of a bridge Hingol River, Makran, Balochistan

A Rock, near Pishkun, Balochistan

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of  A rock, near Pishkun, Balochistan

A Panoramic View of Makran Coastal Highway, Balochistan 

Pictures of Balochistan: A panoramic view of Makran Coastal Highway, Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan, Images of Balochistan

Buzi Pass on Makran Coastal Highway

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Buzi Pass on Mkran Coastal Highway, Balochistan

Barren Hills, Balochistan

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of Barren Hills of Balochistan

RCD Highway, near Bela, Balochistan

Pictures of Balochistan - Photos of Balochistan; Photo of  RCD Highway. near Bela, Baluchistan

These are the historical pictures of Baluchistan, its people and places.

  • Baluchistan - British India - Pakistan - Chappar Rift Railway line
  • Pakistan - Historical pictures - Baluch people - Baluchistan
  • Pakistan - Historical pictures - Baluchistan - Balochistan - Mum - Quetta
  • Pakistan - Historical pictures - Baluch people - Baluchistan
  • Pakistan - Historical pictures - Kalat - Baluch people - Baluchistan
  • Pakistan - Historical pictures - Baluch people - Baluchistan
  • Pakistan - Historical pictures - Baluch people - Baluchistan
  • Pakistan - Historical pictures - Baluch people - Baluchistan
  • Pakistan - Historical pictures - Baluch people - Baluchistan

    A collection of Pictures from Chabahar Balochistan

    A road near Chabahar 10km

    Chabahar Beach
    Chabahar port at night

    City of chabahar

    Port

    Chabahar port from sky

    Mountains Near Chabahar 5km

    Sea

    A Baloch fisher man in Chabahar

    Enjoying riding in mountains of Chabahar Balochistan

    Our Sea

    Amazing Chabahar

    Sunset in chabahar

    Sea Rock chabahar

    Chabahar Beauti

    Only in Chabahar Balochistan

    Beautiful

    Government Building (Occupier iranis)

    Chabahar

    Sandy Mountains near Sea

    Mountains

    Passing Water (Balochistan)


    I Love my homeland…..
    Today,and forevor

10 Comments

10 thoughts on “Beautiful pictures of Baluchistan

  1. Fantastic pictures. Congratulations. To travel the Makran coast is to experience the windy, liberating flatness of Yemen and Oman and their soaring, sawtooth ramparts the color of sandpaper, rising sheer off a desert floor pockmarked with thornbushes. Here, along a coast so empty that you can almost hear the echoing camel hooves of Alexander’s army, you lose yourself in geology. An exploding sea bangs against a knife-carved apricot moonscape of high sand dunes, which, in turn, gives way to crumbly badlands. Farther inland, every sandstone and limestone escarpment is the color of bone. Winds and seismic and tectonic disruptions have left their mark in tortuous folds and uplifts, deep gashes, and conical incrustations that hark back far before the age of human folly.
    Drive along this landscape for hours on end and the only sign of civilization you’ll encounter is the odd teahouse: a partly charred stone hut with jute charpoys, where you can buy musty, Iranian-packaged biscuits and strongly brewed tea. Baluch tribesmen screech into these road stops driving old autos and motorcycles, wearing Arab head scarves, speaking in harsh gutturals, and playing music whose rumbling rhythms, so unlike the introspective twanging ragas of the subcontinent, reverberate with the spirit of Arabia.

      • Hello Yasmeen Sana,

        I live in San Juan Capistrano California – very different from the fantastic moonscape topography of Balochistan.

        In 2002 I was in Balochistan as a guest of falconers from Abu Dhabi. I flew into Shamsi airfield, in a 7 seater Dassault Falcon executive jet, with Bedouin falcon handlers, and 4 falcons on their perches. We have falcons, hawks, eagles, seahawks,peregrines and other predator birds in California wild country and deserts – deserts like the salt flats of Dasht-e-Lut in Iran or the painted Mojave Desert, and the Great Sonoran Desert in Mexico, or the Great Salt Desert of Salar de Atacama, in Chile.

        The Bedouin lived for millennia in the desert, a harsh, unforgiving place that required developing every available tool for harvesting its scarce resources. The ultimate hunting weapon in such an austere environment: falcons. Today, even as Abu Dhabi has become rich, the old ways persist, and behind almost every camel stable and desert retreat is an aviary of saker falcons. Though hunting is severely restricted in Abu Dhabi itself and falconers travel to hunt with their birds in places like Balochistan, Western Sind, Syria or Iraq, the birds must be flown and trained daily.

        Mubarak’s two birds are big, 18 inches (46 centimeters) high, and beautiful, all sharp talons and speckled, with hoods covering their eyes. His newest bird cost $20,000. Out in the desert al Mubarak removes the birds’ exotic hoods, revealing huge round eyes like black marbles. The birds bolt skyward fast, capable of 200 miles an hour (322 kilometers an hour), and especially adept at hunting close to the ground in open terrain.

        Mubarak whirls a feathered, baited lure, and as the bird dives for it, yanks it away. The falcon reels, screams in again, and again al Mubarak snatches the lure away. He’s teaching the bird to come in after the prey and then come in again if it misses its quarry on the first strike. Next, he releases a live pigeon. Though its wings are clipped, it flees surprisingly fast, a dark speck in the twilight. No matter; the falcon is like an F-16 fighter with million-dollar radar. It’s on the pigeon, chasing it and closing in from behind, with uncanny skill, and soon eating dinner.

        As the sun drops, al Mubarak is happy; his bird perched on his wrist, he takes a drink of water and shoots a thin stream into the falcon’s open beak, man and bird in perfect, ageless synchrony.

        To travel the Makran coast is to experience the windy, liberating flatness of Yemen and Oman and their soaring, saw-tooth ramparts the color of sandpaper, rising sheer off a desert floor pockmarked with thorn bushes. Here, along a coast so empty that you can almost hear the echoing camel hooves of Alexander’s army, you lose yourself in geology. An exploding sea bangs against a knife-carved apricot moonscape of high sand dunes, which, in turn, gives way to crumbly badlands. Farther inland, every sandstone and limestone escarpment is the color of bone. Registan-e- Siah Kuh (Badlands of Black Mountain), and Dashte-e-Jahannam (Plain of Hell) are wistful names of the two deserts. Regestn is, for the greater part, a sandy desert with ridges and small, isolated hills of red sand. The sand ridges and dunes, reaching heights of between 50 and 100 feet, alternate with windblown sand-covered plains, devoid of vegetation and changing in some parts into barren gravel and clay.
        Numerous dry creeks run through the desert – which become wild raging rivers during the short lived spring when the snow melts. Winds and seismic and tectonic disruptions have left their mark in tortuous folds and uplifts, deep gashes, and conical incrustations that hark back far before the age of human folly.
        Carcasses of bullocks, dogs, camels, goat and sheep were the decorative features of the desolate landscape. This was a wild weird waste of beige sand, with a black line of hills girdling the horizon on all sides – a stark mountain moonscape that for centuries was home to gunmen who preyed on travelers and harassed invaders in the open dry desolate desert, narrow mountain passes, canyons and a long line of cliffs separating level desert surfaces above and below. A stark dried up lake, Shirbaz, about 3 miles long complete the moonscape.
        The caves that have been used for military purposes since the 1970s are largely man-made. Afghanistan has few natural caves; limestone, from which most natural caves are formed, is found only in isolated areas of the country. Afghanistan’s largest natural cave is the 1,120 foot-long Ab Bar Amada. Most of the man made caves are between 10 to 30 feet deep.

        In Afghan fields, the poppies blow. Yes, even as the Americans are moving deeper
        into the Afghan trap, the warlords and gangsters running much of the western-supported Afghan government are ensuring a bumper new crop of heroin for the world’s markets.
        The UN have warned of this, of course, but nothing is being done. The “war against terror” comes first. The broken roads and highways of Afghanistan are now ribbons of anarchy and brigandage and murder across the country. The pathetic little force of peace-keepers in Kabul cannot control all of the capital, let alone the rest of the country.
        You could find no men more worthy of the title ‘desperado’ than the Pathans [Pashtoons] who live among those jagged, saw-tooth mountains of the Afghan frontier. They obey neither God nor man. Their only law is the law of the gun and the knife.

        In 2012, I was in the southern outskirts of the city Zaranj, Afghanistan, where the last derelict shanties meet an endless, vacant country – beige desert and beige sky, whipped together into a single coalescing haze by the accurately named Wind of 120 Days – there is a place called Ganj: a kind of way station for Afghan migrants trying to reach Iran. Every day except Friday, a little before 2 in the afternoon, hundreds of them gather. Squatting along a metal fence, Hazaras, Tajiks, Pashtuns, Uzbeks and Baluchis from all corners of the country watch the local drivers move through a fleet of dilapidated pickups – raising hoods, inspecting dipsticks. A few hope to continue on to Turkey, Greece and ultimately Western Europe. Most harbor humbler dreams: of living illegally in Iran, of becoming bricklayers, construction laborers, factory workers or farmhands. When one of the drivers announces he is ready to go, as many as 20 migrants pile into the back. The leaf springs flex; the bumper nearly kisses the ground. Arms and legs spill over the sides. Finally, apprehension gives way to expectation, and a few men laugh and wave goodbye.

        I hope this is enough of me and Balochistan, Nimroz and the Makran coast.
        Sincerely,
        alam-ahmed

        Date: Mon, 4 Nov 2013 12:09:54 +0000
        To: murshedalamahmed1938@hotmail.com

  2. Need a shot or two of BalocAt the turn of the 19th Century, the Mekran area of northwest India (now Pakistan) and adjacent southeast Persia was a remote dry strip of land running along the northern coastline of the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Sea. This was, and remains today, one of the most hostile and inaccessible regions in the world. Mountains rising to over 10,000 feet formed a backdrop to the coastal desert. Habitation inland followed watercourses that ran through gorges in the hills where date gardens could be irrigated. Coastal communities existed on fishing and smuggling, with Muscat, in Oman across the Straits of Hormuz, being a major source of illegally-imported weapons. The camel provided a transport resource, as well as milk and meat. The standard of living was very low, bordering on wretched, for many inhabitants. The people were hardy and lawless Muslim Baluch tribesmen who resisted outside interference and who constantly intrigued and fought amongst themselves.h bandits of the desert.

  3. Hello Yasmeen Sana aka Twinkling Star,
    Here is my take on a Baloch Afghan Restaurant some 80 miles from where I live.
    It is called Nimroz (Mid-Day.
    Hole In the Wall Restaurant. This Lake Forest restaurant is lonely, so go give it some lo
    The view outside Nimroz in Lake Forest right now is out of a New England township come fall. Deciduous trees are losing their leaves; their evergreen cousins stand tall, if a bit grayer. The hills across the street, on the other side of El Toro Road, gently roll up toward the horizon, then plunge into the unknown; buildings and houses on this landscape are angular, unique, nothing at all like the usual South Orange County cookie-cutter dread.
    It’s all a façade: the strip mall that hosts Nimroz is desolate. An empty space is the Afghan restaurant’s neighbor; next to that is a dry cleaner that went out of business recently, as evidenced by the still-hanging sign outside and empty racks inside.
    Nimroz is on the section of El Toro Road that’s more accurately known as County Route 18, where cars zoom by (the speed limit is 50 mph), not bothering to even glance. Go in at any time, and it’ll be empty. Workers are inevitably tuned into a exotic Bollywood soap opera and won’t even notice you for a good minute—that’s how unaccustomed they are to diners.
    And it’s a damn shame because the food is spectacular. Though the menu is small and mostly devoted to tried-and-true kebabs, it’s the Afghan specialties that deserve the long, lonely drive to Nimroz. Meals start with a complimentary cup of aush, a chilled chickpea soup heavy on the dill, chutney, mint and chili flakes, an icy-hot combo as electrifying as aguachile.
    All Afghan meals need an order of mantu, the country’s legendary dumplings, fat, beef-filled twirls topped with yogurt and meat sauce, then laced by more of the green mint chutney. An order of mantu will leave you stuffed, so it’s better to come here with three pals to split it, then tuck into Nimroz’s jewel: Qabuli Pulao, a mountain of saffron rice containing steamed carrot slivers, raisins and pistachios hiding succulent lamb chunks. Nimroz serves you so much pulao that when you sink your spoon into the rice, an avalanche of the pilaf comes tumbling off the plate—it’s inevitable, so you might as well line the table with lavash to make impromptu tacos.
    Dessert is another stunner: firnee, a type of custard reeking of rosewater, cardamom and pistachios, each velvety spoonful as jolting a treat as you’ll taste. Nimroz is usually out of firnee, but it offers the same basic ingredients in a rice pudding: equally great, equally worthy of a visit to this desolate land in South Orange County in California.
    Nimroz is also a province in Afghanistan bordering Iran and Pakistan. It is known for bandits, drug smugglers and the dreaded Bad-i-Sad-u-Bist Ruz – “Wind of 120 Days” – the sand pelts you hard enough that it’s painful to keep your eyes open, and the storms come out of the blue so quickly, it can be difficult to prepare for them. This wind is usually accompanied by intense heat, drought, and sand storms, bringing much hardship to the inhabitants of the desert and steppe lands. Dust and whirlwinds frequently occur during the summer months on the flats in the southern part of the country. Rising at midday or in the early afternoon, these “dust winds” advance at velocities ranging between 40 and 100 miles per hour, raising high clouds of dust that envelope the skies.

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